Power/Performance in ICs: Where the trend started

Summary : IBM’s Robert H. Dennard made two of the most revolutionary contributions to the semiconductor industry with his development of the DRAM cell in 1966 and for codifying how “Transistor shrinks result in proportional power and/or performance gains” in 1974.
Annexure :

IBM’s Robert H. Dennard made two of the most revolutionary contributions to the semiconductor industry with his development of the DRAM cell in 1966 and for codifying how “Transistor shrinks result in proportional power and/or performance gains” in 1974. The DRAM cell went on to be a ubiquitous part of all compute platforms from super-computers to smartphones and even to many of the smallest IoT devices. While his equations that showed how semiconductors work faster while consuming less power with each node stopped working as critical dimensions fell below 100nm, Dennard’s Scaling Law continues as a business model and emergent behavior attractor in one-half of all efforts to improve PPAC (Power, Performance, Area, and Cost). This is because improvements in power and performance have consistently grown in the semiconductor market. In Dennard’s era, PP improvements were made by simply making transistors smaller. In one sense, Dennard’s Law still lights the path since Materials-Enabled Scaling came to the forefront after simple scaling ended as a way to continue improvements in power and performance. Dennard’s career was an inspiration to many of today’s leaders. His accomplishments would result in many awards that include the IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award, six IBM Outstanding Invention and Outstanding Contribution Awards, two IBM Corporate Awards, the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the National Medal of Technology, and the Semiconductor Industry Association’s Robert N. Noyce Award.

https://www.ibm.com/blogs/think/2019/11/ibms-robert-h-dennard-and-the-chip-that-changed-the-world/?linkId=76629610

 

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